History of the Book

UNC School of Information and Library Science, INLS 550, Spring 2015

January 8
Introductions

January 13
What is the history of books?

To read before this class:

  1. Darnton, Robert. “What Is the History of Books?,” 1982. http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/3403038.

  2. McKenzie, D. F.“The Book as an Expressive Form.” In Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts. Cambridge University Press, 1999. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511483226.004.

  3. Adams, Thomas R., and Nicolas Barker. “A New Model for the Study of the Book.” In A Potencie of Life: Books in Society. British Library Studies in the History of the Book 1986-1987. London: British Library, 1993. PDF.

  4. Amory, Hugh. “The Trout and The Milk: An Ethnobibliographical Talk.” Harvard Library Bulletin, New Series, 7, no. 1 (Spring 1996): 50–65. http://pds.lib.harvard.edu/pds/view/2573358?n=19693.

January 15
The order of books

We won’t discuss Foucault’s “What Is An Author?” independently, but because Chartier discusses it in “Figures of the Author” you may want to take a look at it if you haven’t before.

To read before this class:

  1. Chartier, Roger. The Order of Books : Readers, Authors, and Libraries in Europe between the Fourteenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Translated by Lydia G. Cochrane. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1994. PDF.

  2. Chartier, Roger. “The Order of Books Revisited.” Modern Intellectual History 4, no. 3 (November 2007): 509–19. http://search.proquest.com/docview/217318314/abstract?accountid=14244.

  3. Foucault, Michel. “What Is an Author?” In The Book History Reader, edited by David Finkelstein and Alistair McCleery, 2nd ed., 281–91. London ;New York: Routledge, 2006. PDF.

January 20
Textual scholarship I

Read pages 1–75. PDF.

To read before this class:

  1. Greetham, D. Textual Scholarship : An Introduction. New York: Garland Pub., 1994.

January 22
Textual scholarship II

Read pages 76–168. PDF.

January 27
Textual scholarship III

Read pages 169–270. PDF.

January 29
Textual scholarship IV

Read pages 271–372. PDF.

February 3
The book of memory I

Read pages 1–121. PDF.

To read before this class:

  1. Carruthers, Mary. The Book of Memory : A Study of Memory in Medieval Culture. ;New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

February 5
The book of memory II

Read pages 122–188. PDF.

February 10
The book of memory III

Read pages 189–260. PDF.

February 12
Alphabetical tools

To read before this class:

  1. Rouse, Richard H., and Mary A. Rouse. “Statim Invenire: Schools, Preachers, and New Attitudes to the Page.” In Authentic Witnesses : Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts, 191–220. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. PDF.

  2. Rouse, Richard H., and Mary A. Rouse. “The Development of Research Tools in the Thirteenth Century.” In Authentic Witnesses : Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts, 221–55. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. PDF.

February 17
The Arabic book I

To read before this class:

  1. Pedersen, Johannes, and Robert | Hillenbrand. The Arabic Book. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1984. http://www.ghazali.org/manuscript/research/ArabicBook.pdf.

    Read pages 1–88.

February 19
The Arabic book II

Read pages 89–141 of Pedersen, The Arabic Book, in addition to Al-Qadi.

To read before this class:

  1. Al-Qadi, W. “How ‘sacred’ Is the Text of an Arabic Medieval Manuscript? The Complex Choices of the Editor-Scholar.” In Theoretical Approaches to the Transmission and Edition of Oriental Manuscritpts: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Istanbul, March 28-30, 2001, edited by J. Pfeiffer and M. Kropp, 13–53. Orient-Institut Beirut, 2007. PDF.

February 24
Muslim textual scholarship

To read before this class:

  1. Rosenthal, Franz, and ʻAbd al-Bāsiṭ ibn Mūsá ʻAlmawī. The Technique and Approach of Muslim Scholarship. Pontificium Institutum Biblicum, 1947. PDF.

February 26
Snow day

No class.

March 3
Managing scholarly information II

Read pages 62–172.

March 5
Visit to Wilson Rare Book Collection

Emily Kader, Rare Book Research Librarian, will show us some selections from the Wilson Library Rare Book Collecton.

March 10
Spring break

No class.

March 12
Spring break

No class.

March 17
Managing scholarly information III

Read pages 173–268.

March 19
The print revolution

To read before this class:

  1. Eisenstein, Elizabeth. “Defining the Initial Shift: Some Features of Print Culture.” In The Book History Reader, edited by David Finkelstein and Alistair McCleery, 2nd ed., 232–54. London ;New York: Routledge, 2006. PDF.

  2. Grafton, Anthony T. “The Importance of Being Printed.” The Journal of Interdisciplinary History 11, no. 2 (October 1, 1980): 265–86. http://www.jstor.org/stable/203783.

  3. Grafton, Anthony. “Introduction.” The American Historical Review 107, no. 1 (February 1, 2002): 84–86. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/532097.

  4. Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. “An Unacknowledge Revolution Revisited.” The American Historical Review 107, no. 1 (February 1, 2002): 87–105. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/532098.

  5. Johns, Adrian. “How to Acknowledge a Revolution.” The American Historical Review 107, no. 1 (February 1, 2002): 106–25. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/532099.

  6. Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. “[How to Acknowledge a Revolution]: Reply.” The American Historical Review 107, no. 1 (February 1, 2002): 126–28. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/532100.

March 24
The search for order I

Read pages 1–96. PDF.

To read before this class:

  1. McKitterick, David. Print, Manuscript and the Search for Order, 1450-1830. Cambridge ;New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

March 26
The search for order II

Read pages 97–186. PDF.

March 31
The search for order III

Read pages 187–230. PDF.

April 2
Final paper proposals

We will share paper proposals with one another.

April 7
Printing in the Muslim world

Read only chapters 4, 5 and 6 of Abdulrazak, The Kingdom of the Book: “Printing in the Muslim World, the case of Istanbul,” “Printing in Morocco: the early attempts,” and “Printing and change in Morocco, 1865-1912.”

To read before this class:

  1. Mahdi, Muhsin. “From the Manuscript Age to the Age of Printed Books.” In The Book in the Islamic World : The Written Word and Communication in the Middle East, 1–16. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=6304&site=ehost-live&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_1.

  2. Bulliet, Richard W. “Medieval Arabic Ṭarsh: A Forgotten Chapter in the History of Printing.” Journal of the American Oriental Society 107, no. 3 (July 1, 1987): 427–38. http://www.jstor.org/stable/603463.

  3. Roper, G. “Al-Jawa’ib Press and the Edition and Transmission of Arabic Manuscript Texts in the 19th Century.” In Theoretical Approaches to the Transmission and Edition of Oriental Manuscritpts: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Istanbul, March 28-30, 2001, edited by J. Pfeiffer and M. Kropp, 237–47. Orient-Institut Beirut, 2007. PDF.

  4. Abdulrazak, Fawzi A. “The Kingdom of the Book: The History of Printing as an Agency of Change in Morocco between 1865 and 1912.” Ph.D., Boston University, 1990. http://search.proquest.com/docview/303798542.

April 9
Mechanisms I

Read pages 1–110. PDF

To read before this class:

  1. Kirschenbaum, Matthew. Mechanisms : New Media and the Forensic Imagination. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2008.

April 14
Mechanisms II

Read pages 111–212. PDF

April 16
Mechanisms III

Read pages 213–260 of Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms (PDF), in addition to Duguid.

To read before this class:

  1. Duguid, Paul. “Material Matters: The Past and Futurology of the Book.” In The Book History Reader, edited by David Finkelstein and Alistair McCleery, 2nd ed., 494–508. London ;New York: Routledge, 2006. PDF.

April 21
Documents I

Read pages 1–82.

To read before this class:

  1. Gitelman, Lisa. Paper Knowledge. Toward a Media History of Documents. Duke University Press, 2014. http://read.dukeupress.edu/content/9780822376767/9780822376767.

April 23
Documents II

Read pages 83–150.

May 1
Final paper due

Assignment #1 Final paper  due

Your paper is due by 3PM on Friday, May 1.